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Radioactive tritium has leaked from three-quarters of U.S. commercial nuclear power sitesYesterday,  Congressmen Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.), senior member of the Energy and  Commerce Committee and Ranking Member on the Natural Resources  Committee and Peter Welch, Chief Deputy Democratic Whip and member of  the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform,  released a Government  Accountability Office report entitled “Nuclear Regulatory Commission:  Oversight of Underground Piping Systems Commensurate with Risk, but  Proactive Measures Could Help Address Future Leaks”.The report  concludes that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and licensees  “cannot be assured that underground safety-related pipes remain  structurally sound without having information about degradation that has  occurred. Without such assurance, the likelihood of future pipe  failures cannot be as accurately assessed, and this increases the  uncertainty surrounding the safety of the plants.” Buried pipes  at nuclear power plants carry water necessary to cool nuclear reactors.  Other buried pipes carry diesel to fuel the emergency generators that  power cooling systems in case of a blackout.
Radioactive tritium has leaked from three-quarters of U.S. commercial  nuclear power sites, often into groundwater from corroded, buried  piping. The number and severity of the leaks has been escalating, even  as federal regulators extend the licenses of more and more reactors  across the nation.Tritium, which is a radioactive form of hydrogen,  has leaked from at least 48 of 65 sites, according to U.S. Nuclear  Regulatory Commission records. Leaks from at least 37 of those  facilities contained concentrations exceeding the federal drinking water  standard… sometimes at hundreds of times the limit. While most leaks  have been found within plant boundaries, some have migrated offsite. But  none is known to have reached public water supplies.
"Just as a power outage was the root cause of the core meltdowns at  Fukushima, a failure of buried pipes that carry cooling water to the  reactor cores could lead to a similar emergency here in the U.S." said  Rep. Markey. "There would be no warning because no one ever checks the  integrity of these underground pipes. These pipes have more leaks than  the Vancouver Canucks goaltending. The NRC must require inspections of  these pipes before they deteriorate instead of its current policy of  crossing fingers and hoping for the best."
source: Congressmen Edward J. Markey

Radioactive tritium has leaked from three-quarters of U.S. commercial nuclear power sites

Yesterday, Congressmen Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.), senior member of the Energy and Commerce Committee and Ranking Member on the Natural Resources Committee and Peter Welch, Chief Deputy Democratic Whip and member of the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform,  released a Government Accountability Office report entitled “Nuclear Regulatory Commission: Oversight of Underground Piping Systems Commensurate with Risk, but Proactive Measures Could Help Address Future Leaks”.
The report concludes that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and licensees “cannot be assured that underground safety-related pipes remain structurally sound without having information about degradation that has occurred. Without such assurance, the likelihood of future pipe failures cannot be as accurately assessed, and this increases the uncertainty surrounding the safety of the plants.”

Buried pipes at nuclear power plants carry water necessary to cool nuclear reactors. Other buried pipes carry diesel to fuel the emergency generators that power cooling systems in case of a blackout.

Radioactive tritium has leaked from three-quarters of U.S. commercial nuclear power sites, often into groundwater from corroded, buried piping. The number and severity of the leaks has been escalating, even as federal regulators extend the licenses of more and more reactors across the nation.
Tritium, which is a radioactive form of hydrogen, has leaked from at least 48 of 65 sites, according to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission records. Leaks from at least 37 of those facilities contained concentrations exceeding the federal drinking water standard… sometimes at hundreds of times the limit. While most leaks have been found within plant boundaries, some have migrated offsite. But none is known to have reached public water supplies.

"Just as a power outage was the root cause of the core meltdowns at Fukushima, a failure of buried pipes that carry cooling water to the reactor cores could lead to a similar emergency here in the U.S." said Rep. Markey. "There would be no warning because no one ever checks the integrity of these underground pipes. These pipes have more leaks than the Vancouver Canucks goaltending. The NRC must require inspections of these pipes before they deteriorate instead of its current policy of crossing fingers and hoping for the best."

source: Congressmen Edward J. Markey

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